interactivity

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ANN: Buster, the not quite entirely unlike FRP library.

Wednesday, April 1st, 2009

Note: I just released an update to 0.99.2.  Now included are Widgets for getting environment vars and command line args and the EData type has been extracted from Event to be separate.

People seem to like the idea so far, so I’m releasing the thing I posted about yesterday on Hackage and we’ll see who uses it.  I’m calling it Buster for now, because I’m bad at naming my own projects.  Haddock documentation is here. The following is a brief example of how to use the library:

module Main where

import App.Widgets.GtkMouseKeyboard
import App.Behaviours.PrintEvents
import App.EventBus

import Control.Concurrent
import qualified Graphics.UI.Gtk as Gtk
import qualified System.Glib.MainLoop as Gtk

main = do
    Gtk.unsafeInitGUIForThreadedRTS -- buster is multithreaded, so you will need this.
    window <- Gtk.windowNew -- create a window to bind the mouse keyboard widget to
    Gtk.windowSetDefaultSize window 800 600
    Gtk.widgetShowAll window

    let mk = bindMouseKeyboardWidget (Gtk.castToWidget window) -- bind the widget

    -- bus is our main loop
    bus [mk]                                                   -- add the widget to the bus
        (Gtk.mainContextIteration Gtk.mainContextDefault True) -- the bus executes this thunk to collect data from widgets, if necessary (to support the various main loops out there, like GLUT and Gtk)
        printEventsBehaviour                                   -- add the behaviour to the bus

Compiling this after install buster will get you a single Gtk window which tracks your mouse position, scroll wheel direction, button press releases and keyboard and outputs it via the printEventsBehaviour, which is pretty useful overall for debugging. Output looks like this:

name:     Position
source:   GtkWindow.KeyboardMouseWidget
group:    Mouse
ttl:      Iterations 1
emitTime: 20:10:26
580.0
85.0

By inspecting the source of GtkMouseKeyboard and PrintEvents you can see in a pretty straightforward manner (I think anyway) how to code your own behaviours and widgets.  I reccommend sticking to the various default datatypes and not depending on the “a” of “Event a” to be anything in particular, because that means that your widgets will be compatible with everyone else’s.  I intend the “a” to be determined by the actual application developer to do special purpose things.  If people are interested, I’ll open  up a space on here where you can upload your own widgets (as cabalized source dists) and I will compile them into one library called buster-widgets-community which I’ll update whenever other people add widgets.  If not, there will be some basic support for GL and XML-RPC webservices that i’ll add as I need it for The Big Board.

Almost, but not quite entirely unlike FRP.

Tuesday, March 31st, 2009

Yes, it’s to solve a particular problem.  And yes, this is a rough draft of an explanation of how it works.  I’ve not even really solidified the vocabulary yet, but I have this module, EventBus, which couches a large, abstract, interactive (both with the user and the system), multicomponent application in terms of a bus, inputs, behaviours, and events.

  • Time is continuous and infinite.
  • An event is a static, discrete item associated with a particular time.
  • The bus is the discrete view of event in time at an instant.
  • A widget is an IO action that assigns events to a particular time based only upon sampling the outside world (other events and behaviours are irrelevant to it).  e.g. a Gtk Button is a widget, a readable network socket is an widget, the mouse is an widget, the keyboard is an widget, a multitouch gesture engine is a widget.
  • A behaviour is a continuous item — it exists for the entire program and for all times — which maps events on the bus to other events on the bus.  It is an IO action as well — where widgets only sample the outside world and are in a sense read only, behaviours encapsulate reading and writing.

In a sense a behaviour is an application by itself. Examples of behaviours are: writing a file (the file itself is an Event), opening and reading a file, rendering data to the screen, and so on.  Behaviours also encompass more mundane tasks: translating mouse button up and down events that are close together in time to click, double click, and triple click events.  Behaviours are composable and with the presence of a passthrough behaviour form a monoid.  An application is a composition of 1 or more behaviours and a “running” application are those behaviours applied to a sample of time (as we have defined it earlier) and the real world.

Behaviours are attached to the bus.  They are composed by relating their sample of time, their bus, to the sample that other behaviours receive. Thus we define three combinators that relate events: behind, infront, and beside (given by operators (<~<, >~>, and |~| respectively)

If behaviour A is “behind” behaviour B, then behaviour A will see the time on the bus right after behaviour B.  Behaviour B’s filtering of events happens before behaviour A’s sample of time.

If behaviour A is “in front of” behaviour B, then behaviour A will see the time on the bus right before behaviour B.  Behaviour A’s filtering will happen before behavour B’s sample of time.

If behaviour A is “beside” behaviour B, then their order is undefined, and they may filter the bus concurrently.  This leads to a well defined merge of the two filtered buses as defined in the famous paper that inspired Unix diff(1).

So what’s the type of behaviour?

type Behaviour a = Bus a -> Future [Diff a]
data Diff a = Insertion (Event a) | Deletion (Event a)

Future encapsulates the notion that the behaviour doesn’t define where in time the events it introduces are, only that they exist in some time after the time the Behaviour samples.  Diffs encode the notion that time after the Behaviour’s sample can be described by insertions or deletions of events that exist in time before the Behaviour’s sample.

Now let’s enumerate what exists in an event.

data Event a = Event {
    name :: String   -- a name that is unique within the group of events
  , group :: String  -- together with name and src, part of the fully qualified name of the event.
  , src :: String    -- the source of the event
  , eventdata :: [EData a]  -- the data associated with the event
  , timespan :: TimeSpan    -- how long after the event appears on the bus
  , time :: UTCTime }       -- the time that the event appeared on the bus

data TimeSpan = Persistent | Time DiffTime | Iterations Int
data EData a = EString String | EChar Char | EStringL [String] | EInt Int | EIntL [Int] | EDouble Double | EDoubleL [Double] | EOther a

The various names give the behaviours various ways of sampling events on the bus.  The event data defines some basic types and allows for a user defined type as well, and the data itself is a collection (I chose a list, but in fact the ordering doesn’t have to be defined).  The timespan defines the width on the timeline that the event is visible from its start.  Some events are persistent until deletion.  Some events, like mouse clicks, can be defined using Iteration so that they disappear after it’s clear no behaviour will consume them.  Other events exist for some discrete time over the continuous time stream.

Here’s a diagram of how the system works as a whole:

bus1

If people don’t recoil in terror over this post, I might even release it to the wild.  So far I’ve incorporated a behaviour that encapsulates the Gtk mouse/keyboard event gamut and one that handles Renci’s own multitouch library, and I plan to integrate it with other things as I continue developing the Big Board application.  It should be relatively straightforward, even to write a function that generically wraps any simple Gtk Widget and several of the more complex ones into the bus.  Then other things like network collections, web service clients, and the like could become behaviours as well.

Anyway, let me know what you think…